Hearing Aids

Today, hearing aids can be programmed specifically for your hearing needs. Most have a tiny inbuilt computer which will automatically adjust to minute changes in sounds, giving you clearer, crisper sound and better speech understanding than ever before.

Most people with hearing loss can benefit from hearing aids. Just as there are many types and degrees of hearing loss, there are many different hearing aids available with a wide range of functions and features to address individual needs. Modern hearing aids are very discreet and are barely visible.

Some of the many features of modern hearing aids include:

Ear to ear communication

A modern hearing aid is fundamentally a microcomputer, they use sound information coming from both sides of the head to determine the best settings for each ear. This is calculated many thousands of times per second to ensure you hear the best, even in challenging situations. In addition to this, by allowing ear to ear communication, this simplifies the use and control of the hearing aids. One example is to use the switches on the left device for volume changes (to both aids) and the right device for programme changes (to both aids).

Invisible aids

With very recent changes in micro technology, it is now possible to manufacture very tiny hearing aids that in the right ear, will be 100% invisible.​

Wireless accessories

There are a large range of devices that hearing aids can now connect to, and most manufacturers provide a good level of connectivity to phones, TVs, MP3 players etc. In addition to this, many now are designed to work well with an iPhone and in some cases use the GPS capability of the iPhone to geotag certain favourite locations, where the user is able to customise the sounds to their liking. The iPhone app also allows the use of the iPhone as a remote microphone, including recording which can be very useful in lectures and meetings. It won’t be long before those without hearing loss will be wanting to take advantage of this technology!​

Rechargeable batteries

Hearing aid batteries are very cheap to buy, but for some patients they struggle with replacing them, particularly if they have limited eyesight, or very poor dexterity. Rechargeable batteries are a great option for these patients and take away the hassle of needing to replace tiny batteries.​

High frequency transposition

Many high frequency hearing losses have sections of the higher tones where the hair cell receptors in the inner ear are actually dead. This causes a problem when amplifying these tones, as no matter how loud they are amplified, the ear is unable to receive those signals and send them to the brain. The latest devices often have technology built-in to capture these sounds and represent them at a lower frequency, where the ear has some residual hearing left and present them there. While the tone of the sounds are a little different, it opens up a whole new range of sounds to the wearer who would otherwise be unable to enjoy these sounds, many of which are important speech cues.

Advanced directional microphones

Many hearing devices today are equipped with very advanced microphone systems that are designed to reduce the effect of background noise. One brand that Hearing Technology has access to claims through two university studies to provide “better than normal hearing” using their latest microphone technology.

Hearing Aids

Today, hearing aids can be programmed specifically for your hearing needs. Most have a tiny inbuilt computer which will automatically adjust to minute changes in sounds, giving you clearer, crisper sound and better speech understanding than ever before.

Most people with hearing loss can benefit from hearing aids. Just as there are many types and degrees of hearing loss, there are many different hearing aids available with a wide range of functions and features to address individual needs. Modern hearing aids are very discreet and are barely visible.

Some of the many features of modern hearing aids include:

Ear to ear communication

A modern hearing aid is fundamentally a microcomputer, they use sound information coming from both sides of the head to determine the best settings for each ear. This is calculated many thousands of times per second to ensure you hear the best, even in challenging situations. In addition to this, by allowing ear to ear communication, this simplifies the use and control of the hearing aids. One example is to use the switches on the left device for volume changes (to both aids) and the right device for programme changes (to both aids).

High frequency transposition

Many high frequency hearing losses have sections of the higher tones where the hair cell receptors in the inner ear are actually dead. This causes a problem when amplifying these tones, as no matter how loud they are amplified, the ear is unable to receive those signals and send them to the brain. The latest devices often have technology built-in to capture these sounds and represent them at a lower frequency, where the ear has some residual hearing left and present them there. While the tone of the sounds are a little different, it opens up a whole new range of sounds to the wearer who would otherwise be unable to enjoy these sounds, many of which are important speech cues.

Advanced directional microphones

Many hearing devices today are equipped with very advanced microphone systems that are designed to reduce the effect of background noise. One brand that Hearing Technology has access to claims through two university studies to provide “better than normal hearing” using their latest microphone technology.

Invisible aids

With very recent changes in micro technology, it is now possible to manufacture very tiny hearing aids that in the right ear, will be 100% invisible.​

Wireless accessories

There are a large range of devices that hearing aids can now connect to, and most manufacturers provide a good level of connectivity to phones, TVs, MP3 players etc. In addition to this, many now are designed to work well with an iPhone and in some cases use the GPS capability of the iPhone to geotag certain favourite locations, where the user is able to customise the sounds to their liking. The iPhone app also allows the use of the iPhone as a remote microphone, including recording which can be very useful in lectures and meetings. It won’t be long before those without hearing loss will be wanting to take advantage of this technology!​

Rechargeable batteries

Hearing aid batteries are very cheap to buy, but for some patients they struggle with replacing them, particularly if they have limited eyesight, or very poor dexterity. Rechargeable batteries are a great option for these patients and take away the hassle of needing to replace tiny batteries.​

Hearing Technology Logo
Hearing Technology Logo

This is a mockup. Publish to view how it will appear live.